Center for Dental Informatics: Talks and Presentations

Care Coordination Issues in Diabetes and Oral Health (43:46 min; Beatrice Gandara, DDS, MSD; 08/10/2012): Evidence that oral and systemic health are related in diabetic patients is supported by an increasing number of studies. This Webinar provides an overview of oral manifestations of diabetes that can be easily recognized by all health care providers, and discusses the groundwork that is necessary to support communication between medical and dental providers. Standardized and customized workflows will be required to optimize care coordination for patients with diabetes.

Dental Informatics Research Seminar: Developing Infrastructure, Critical Mass and Member Engagement in e-Communities: The Experience of the Dental Informatics Online Community (82:36 min; Jeannie Irwin, MS, PhD; 11/04/2011): The Dental Informatics Online Community (DIOC) is a Web community for people interested in dental informatics. It is designed to provide resources, foster relationships and disseminates information. Established in 2005, the DIOC has grown to 1,206 members, the world’s largest community for dental informatics. In this talk, Dr. Jeannie Irwin describes the current state of the community, and discusses plans for the future.

From Invention to Innovation: iPhone Apps as Public Health Intervention in Influenza (62:41 min; Miguel H. Torres-Urquidy, DDS, MS; 05/03/2012): Triaging patients correctly during influenza pandemics is important to ensure healthcare resources are used optimally during the crisis. This project translated clinical algorithms for the flu to an app format to assist clinicians with triage. The algorithms have been developed by the Department of Health and Human Services and are available on the http://flu.gov Website.

Dental Informatics: Time to Join the Revolution? (42:49 min; Titus Schleyer, DMD, PhD; 01/04/2012): The "digitization" of dental practice is rapidly progressing, but there is a large gap between the clinical and administrative use of computers. Almost all dental practices have a computer, but only a minute fraction of general dentists (1.8%) use it in the operatory. This presentation discusses how dental informatics can help improve oral health by using electronic patient data for quality assurance, documenting patient care using natural language and delivering evidence-based decision aids with computers. Time for a revolution!

Digital Vita: The University of Pittsburgh's research networking system (Titus Schleyer, DMD, PhD; 11/18/11): Digital Vita (DV), a research networking application developed by the University of Pittsburgh, was implemented in the summer of 2009 at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Center. DV integrates CV management functions with academic social networking and basic research team management and collaboration functions. Departing from the functional design typical for most research networking applications, DVís functionality is centrally anchored in the workflow of scientists. By providing a system for maintaining CV information and generating NIH biosketches, DV produces records of expertise and social networks as a byproduct.

Implementing research findings and evidence-based interventions into real-world dental practice settings (70:59 min; Heiko Spallek; 7/1/11): Each year, billions of U.S. tax dollars are spent on research and 2.5 trillions are spent on health care delivery. However, relatively little is spent on, or known about, how best to ensure that the lessons learned from research inform and improve the quality of health. This research project will address the third step of the ADA’s policy on EB dentistry, which is "focused on translating the findings from systematic reviews for use by practitioners." We will contribute to the development of next-generation practice management systems. Results from this research will help us to refine hypotheses, establish feasibility and provide pilot data necessary for a follow-up (R01) study to compare the effectiveness of various implementations in a real-world dental practice setting.
This research project will address the third step of the ADA’s policy on EB dentistry, which is "focused on translating the findings from systematic reviews for use by practitioners." We will contribute to the development of next-generation practice management systems. Results from this research will help us to refine hypotheses, establish feasibility and provide pilot data necessary for a follow-up study to compare the effectiveness of various implementations in a real-world dental practice setting.

Digital Vita: Research networking in the context of CV management (64:20 min; Titus Schleyer, DMD, PhD; 5/11/2011): Digital Vita is a scientific CV management and social networking system being developed by the University of Pittsburgh's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. Its primary goal is to facilitate the formation of high-impact collaborations among biomedical scientists.

E-prescribing feasibility project in dentistry (57:34 min; Marc Clayton; 1/21/11): Computer technology in clinical dentistry is becoming increasingly popular. Despite this, current software applications often do not support the specific needs or behaviors of the dentists. Current evidence shows that electronic prescribing is a piece of this technology that is quickly becoming common in medical practice. Dentistry has not yet seen an influx of electronic prescribing, but this growth is predicted to increase in the near future. Although electronic prescribing has been introduced in theory, very little research has been done in dentistry. Without evaluation of tools and dental workflow, the addition of a clinical computer system can cause negative effects. This presentation describes e-prescribing in general and a study design to evaluate e-prescribing in dentistry.

How can dental informatics help to improve oral health? (56:51 min; Titus Schleyer; 1/7/11): The "digitization" of dental practice is rapidly progressing. Almost all dental practices have computers, but only 25% of general dentists use them in the operatory. In this presentation, we will take a look at three challenges to improving oral health: documenting patient care, translating best evidence into practice and advancing knowledge through practice-based research. We will discuss how dental informatics research can help address these challenges.

Periodontal charting: Innovations and challenges going forward (81:15 min; Dimitris S. Papageorgiou; 11/2/10): Significant technological advances have been realized in the area of dental charting. Specifically, in the area of periodontal charting, voice-activation is improving the exam speed while eliminating transcription errors. In addition, innovative graphical user interfaces help dental providers focus more on the patient and less on how to use the software. Automating the analysis and comparison of periodontal exams provides timely information to the dental provider, thus enabling further focus on the patient needs. These are the areas that are addressed by the newly released DenChart™ solution, and which will be illustrated and discussed during the session.

Requirements for patient-centered dental treatment plans (49:10 min; Chuck Borromeo, Marc Clayton, Sherry Hess; 6/24/10): This project will determine the needs and wants of patients as well as dentists in defining requirements for an educational, patient-centered presentation of the dental treatment plan.

Family studies of cleft lip and cleft palate (79:59 min; Mary Marazita; 4/8/10): This research seminar discusses the genetics of cleft lip and palate. Nonsyndromic oral clefts are common congenital anomalies that result from defects during embryonic development. Many genes and signaling pathways are involved in causing these anomalies during craniofacial development. We will discuss several responsible genes that have been identified so far, as well as the types of studies used to elucidate the etiology of cleft lip and palate.

Speech to chart: Speech recognition and natural language processing for dental charting (44:51 min; Jeannie Irwin, MS; 9/15/2009): This talk describes a prototype system that converts a written dental exam into a Dentrix chart. In the future, the system will allow clinicians to enter findings using spoken, natural language.

Access CDI Talks and Presentations on iTunes U. Click here for instructions.

Comments/suggestions on the CDI's Talks and Presentations? Would you like to suggest a topic or give a presentation? Simply contact Dr. Titus Schleyer!